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                                                               YIDDISH THEATRE 101 > THE YIDDISH PLAYS > THE PLAY IN HISTORY  >  THE THIRD PARADE

 

Artef Theatre

(THE ONLY JEWISH WORKERS' THEATRE IN AMERICA)

At the

HECKSCHER FOUNDATION
FIRTH AVENUE and 104th STREET


"The Third Parade"

(Der driter parad)

A revolutionary drama of the Bonus March, in three acts, eight scenes

By CHARLES WALKER and PAUL PETERS

Yiddish by M. OLGIN

Direction: BENNO SCHNEIDER            SCENERY DESIGNED by BEN-YANO


CAST OF CHARACTERS:

(in order of their appearance)

 

Ozzie

M. Goldstein

Mitch

D. Holtz

Specks

H. Bender

Tex

M. Schneiderman

Swede Olsen

A. Horwitz

Bill

M. Friedman

Budd

I. Velichansky and H. Cohen

Roy

S. Levine

Lumber Jack

H. Rosen

Stankewitch

H. Brisman

Tarhill

I. Levenstein

Marge

L. Rymer and B. Dorfman

Mott

H. Cramer

Gen. Hardcourt (Chief of Police)

S. Eisikoff

Hurly, Secretary of War

S. Nagoshiner

Mills, Secretary of Finance

A. Hirshbein

Rivers, Commander of B.E.F.

M. Dubitsky

Ingersoll, Officer

M. Sheff

The Leader of the Death Marchers

B. Jacobs

First Marcher

H. Rosen

Second Marcher

M. Pitkowitz

Third Marcher

S. Kulman

Fourth Marcher

I. Gostinsky

Nurse

E. Freiman

Sergeant

A. Shapiro

Mrs. Collom

T. Todrina

Treasury Official

O. Shreiber

First Soldier

M. Pitkowitz

Second Soldier

N. Gvirtzman

Third Soldier

A. Shapiro

Veterans, Death Marchers, Policeen and Soldiers.

 

Cop

I. Levenstein

Superintendent

I. Gostinsky

A Worker

M. Sheff

Dick

O. Shreiber

Bull

A. Shapiro
 

Time: 1932.            Place: U.S.A.

First Act:

First Scene: Hoovervile, in Gary, Indiana.

Second Scene: Railroad Yard.

Third Scene: Railroad Car.

Second Act:

Fourth Scene: In the White House.

Fifth Scene: In Front of the Congress House.

Third Act:

Sixth Scene: An Office.

Seventh Scene: On Pennsylvania Avenue.

Eighth Scene: On the Field.
 

SYNOPSIS OF THE PLAY

 

Act I

Scene 1: Having built a Hooverville Camp on the I.C. Railroad property in Gary, Indiana, a group of unemployed workers are faced with an order of the department of sanitation to evacuate at noon. Mitch Butler's adroitness dispatches the policeman to phone his chief about a so-called "counter-order." The arrival of Bud Morris, a former salesman, who urges them to join the Bonus Expeditionary Force, fires them with enthusiasm. The indignant policeman returns to a scene of commotion and preparation for departure that leaves him gasping when they merrily march off.

Scene 2: The veterans appropriate a "B. and O." freight-train for transportation to Pittsburgh. Bud's ingratiating advances fail to appease the irate superintendent, who threatens them with a police raid. It is only when Roy, a member of the Ex-Servicemen's League, and leader of the "Michigan bunch," prevails upon the round-house workers to arrange a walk-out, that the super is compelled to give the veterans transportation.

Scene 3: As the freight approaches a water tower, a railroad-dick bursts into one of the box-cars. His orders are to jump. He sights Ozzie, a Negro, and orders him the first off. Defended by the others, Ozzie refuses to go. The Lumberjack and Swede advance upon the dick -- whereupon he whips out his revolver and shoots. Still guarding himself, he jumps from the car. The veterans turn to the dead Lumberjack. No one knows who he is, where he comes from. "He was just a Vet, and he needed the bonus."

Act 2.

Scene 4: Called before the Secretary of Finance, Mills, and Secretary of War, Hurly, Police Commissioner Hardcourt is severely reprimanded for permitting the veterans to camp in Washington. The Secretaries demand immediate dispersion by militia. Hardcourt, however, advised friendly caution towards the veterans. He plans to work through Gen. Rivera and instructs him to call demonstration before Congress in opposition to the tactics of his "reds" -- and "make it a River's demonstration." But his final instructions are: "All men back to camp." Hardcourt is given one month to prove his project successful.

Scene 5: Roy hands out leaflets for picket-action to the vets stationed before Congress awaiting Rivers. The "Death Marchers," veterans picketing Congress for their "Bonus, or drop dead," urge Rivers' army to join them. Unable to withstand the appeal, many attach themselves to the marchers. In order to quiet the men, Hardcourt speaks to them. Rivers finally appears with news of victory: Congress will not close session before granting the bonus. His order to return to camp is thwarted by "Tar-hill's" statement that Congress has adjourned. The Vets demand picket-action, but the police break up their ranks.

Act 3.

Scene 6: The month's time granted Hardcourt has expired. Mills and Hurly wish to take action and the commissioner leaves in a huff upbraiding their tactics. Hurly fears their course of action will react badly upon the election. Mills answers: "Do you remember Coolidge and the police strike? That made him president."

Scene 7: Striving to maintain the remnants of his authority, Rivers urges the vets not to protest the order of the Treasury Department to evacuate the Pennsylvania Avenue buildings. the derisive answer of the Vets is that they're willing to remain until 1945 for the bonus. Not even Hardcourt's threats shake their determination. The militia is now ready for attack. The Veterans still doubt an onslaught by fellow soldiers -- but the command is to fire convinces them that the war is on.

Scene 8: Guarded by troopers the Vets are escorted in trucks to the Pennsylvania-Maryland state line. Many have been wounded, many killed. Deeply embittered by their government's treachery, the Veterans listen to Roy's words which are an incentive to gather new forces of farmers and workers and complete the work begun in Washington. So that when a trooper pushes him on, Mitch answers, "We'll come back, and we'll know what to do with the guns. We know the trade, buddy. S'long."

 



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